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Kid Williams & Roy Martin / Kid Williams - Birmingham Jail / The Prisoner And The Rose mp3 album

Kid Williams & Roy Martin  / Kid Williams - Birmingham Jail / The Prisoner And The Rose mp3 album
  • Performer: Kid Williams
  • Title: Birmingham Jail / The Prisoner And The Rose
  • Genre: World & Country
  • Country: US
  • Music style: Country
  • MP3 size: 1729 mb
  • FLAC size 1880 mb
  • Formats MP4 AUD AU RA WAV XM AHX

Birmingham Jail, the Prisoner and the Rose. Birmingham Jail (Down in the Valley) by Leadbelly (1935). Birmingham Jail by Darby and Tarlton (1927).

The Letter from Birmingham Jail, also known as the Letter from Birmingham City Jail and The Negro Is Your Brother, is an open letter written on April 16, 1963, by Martin Luther King Jr. The letter defends the strategy of nonviolent resistance to racism. It says that people have a moral responsibility to break unjust laws and to take direct action rather than waiting potentially forever for justice to come through the courts.

Letters to a Birmingham Jail provides a thermostatic rather than a thermometeristic approach to the church's response to inequity and injustice within the world it serves to adjust rather than to acknowledge the social temperature. It is bathed in a solution that fosters authentic racial reconciliation within the church, thus serving as a headlight rather than a taillight to the world. Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, J. s Letter from Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed a Nation.

MLK uses diction and pathos, as well as allusions to solidify his arguments throughout the letter. Martin Luther King Jr. makes careful choices in his diction which strengthen his arguments. He makes an effort to not offend or criticize his readers. The line With his black brothers of Africa and his brown and yellow brothers of Asia, South America and the Caribbean, (p269 ¶30), MLK establishes a connection with all races and people, showing he is a man of equality and justice. He consistently uses the word brothers, even when referring to whites to show he bears no hatred for them. p270 ¶33) He appears to merely try to get the readers to see the injustice of segregation and not trying to disparage the clergymen’s opinions.

24 quotes from Letter from the Birmingham Jail: ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. Martin Luther King J. Letter from the Birmingham Jail. tags: change, hope, ignorance, prejudice, racism.

Tracklist

A Kid Williams & Roy Martin Birmingham Jail
B Kid Williams The Prisoner And The Rose

Credits

  • Accompanied By – Texas Mud Splashers
  • Steel Guitar [Uncredited] – Patt Patterson
  • Tenor Banjo [Uncredited] – Lois Dexter
  • Vocals [Uncredited] – Walter Smith
  • Vocals [Uncredited], Guitar [Uncredited] – Lewis McDaniels

Notes

Both sides recorded 5 May 1930 in New York, NY.

Side A matrix no. 9705-1.
Side B matrix no. 9706-1.

This coupling also released on Banner 32096, Jewel 20020, Oriole 8020, Regal 10301, Homestead 16114, and Homestead 23036.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Side A label): 19705
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B label): 19706
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A runout): 9705-1 2 13
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B runout): 9706-1 3 4

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
16114 Kid Williams & Roy Martin / Kid Williams Kid Williams & Roy Martin / Kid Williams - Birmingham Jail / The Prisoner And The Rose ‎(Shellac, 10") Homestead 16114 US Unknown
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